• Simple autumn soup

    Tonight’s simple autumn soup: Put the following ingredients on a tray in the oven for 30 minutes at 220 degrees C: approximately 3 medium-sized parsnips diced 1 onion in wedges 2 cloves garlic about 1/2-1 tsp was of coriander seeds, cumin seeds, mustard seeds and turmeric about 2 tablespoons olive oil in 30 min 220 degrees. Leave to cool a little, then put into a food processor with half a jar/tin of crushed tomatoes (alternatively, you could use 2 fresh tomatoes cut into quarters and baked along with the above ingredients in the oven) and half a liter of stock. Transfer everything into a large saucepan with black pepper and…

  • Recipes and ideas

    Now we are halfway through our first year of growing here in Falkenberg. We’ve tried to keep to a broad selection with the goal of having a mix of roots, leaves, pulses, brassicas and herbs for as much of the season as possible. During the summer we have lived almost entirely on our vegetables as well as dairy products and eggs from Skrea Ost down the road. Some of the vegetables we’ve sold to customers have come with a string of questions. We realise that we grow some things that are less commonly found in the supermarkets and may be harder to find inspiration and recipes for. We’ve therefore added…

  • Broad bean bruschetta

    This is one of our favourite ways to enjoy broad beans. In addition, we think it’s a great alternative to avocados, avoiding the journey halfway around the world to get to the table. A bunch of broad beans, the more the better (if you’ve not got enough, add a few peas) A handful of fresh mint, chopped A little olive oil A small piece of finely preserved lemon (or a dash of lemon juice, a little grated lemon peel and a pinch of salt) Black pepper Sliced sourdough bread, lightly toasted Garlic clove, divided lengthwise A little grated parmesan cheese (alternatively roasted seeds or mint as a vegan alternative) Cook…

  • Pesto from carrot tops

    Here’s an improvised pesto that we made today when we proudly picked our first small carrots for the season. First, we munched our way through the wonderfully sweet and aromatic roots. Next, we took the tops and added these other ingredients to the food processor: A bunch of carrot tops A small handful of hazelnuts (roasted if you have time) A small clove of garlic (optional) About 1-2 cm preserved lemon peel and “liquid salt” from the lemons to taste (can use ordinary lemon juice or grated rind and a little salt) A piece of Parmesan cheese (can be excluded for vegan option) Some olive oil A splash of water…

  • First spring onions

    These are White Lisbon. They were sown in modules indoors 15/2 and planted out 15/3. We have sown them in “clumps”, with 6-7 seeds in each module. Now we are starting to harvest one from every clump, making room for the others to keep growing. We’ll try sowing them again in the autumn to see if we can get an early spring harvest next year.

  • Peas at last!

    This is Sugar Ann, a type of sugar snap. We sowed the seeds in modules indoors on the 28th February and planted the little seedlings out on the 16th March. We then covered them with fleece until they established themselves and the earth warmed up a bit. It is a dwarf type and does not need much support. And it’s sweet with a lovely crunch!

  • Weather challenges

    It’s been an unusual spring with hot summer days in April followed by hail and snow. We’ve covered the frost-tender plants, but most have received some degree of hail damage. Their still just as tasty, but storage times are shorter and they’re more vulnerable to pests and disease in the ground. We’ve therefore harvested large amounts of spinach, salad leaves and radishes lately. We eat lots of fresh spinach and have frozen some. Friends and family have helped us get through the mounds of fresh salad. Early spring radishes are very popular with us, but there’s still a limit to how many can be eaten. So we’ve pickled some too…